Authors: 9–12

Kate Saunders

Kate is a bestselling and Costa Award winning author of children’s fiction. Five Children on the Western Front is an incredible sequel to E. Nesbit’s Five Children and It set on the eve of the First World War.
Her CILIP Carnegie Medal-shortlisted The Land of Neverendings is a heartbreaking yet warm and funny story about the world of imagination and silliness. 

2 books

Five Children on the Western Front

An incredible, heart-wrenching sequel to E. Nesbit’s Five Children and It, set on the eve of the First World War. The five children have grown up – war will change their lives for ever.

Cyril is off to fight, Anthea is at art college, Robert is a Cambridge scholar and Jane is at high school. The Lamb is the grown up age of 11, and he has a little sister, Edith, in tow. The sand fairy has become a creature of stories . . . until he suddenly reappears. The siblings are pleased to have something to take their minds off the war, but this time the Psammead is here for a reason, and his magic might have a more serious purpose.

Before this last adventure ends, all will be changed, and the two younger children will have seen the Great War from every possible viewpoint – factory-workers, soldiers and sailors, nurses and the people left at home, and the war’s impact will be felt right at the heart of their family.

The Land of Neverendings

Emily watched, in a trance of astonishment, as the bear opened the picnic basket, took out a tartan rug and spread it on Holly’s bed. 
And then the penguin spoke. 
Actually spoke
‘What’s going on? This isn’t Pointed End!’
The bear said, ‘It looks like a human bedroom. We must’ve come through the wrong door.’

What if there exists a world powered by imagination?

A world of silliness, where humans and their toys live on long after they’ve left the Hard World . . . and what if the door between that world and this one was broken?

Welcome to the Land of Neverendings.

Moving, raw and funny in all the right ways, The Land of Neverendings is a rip-roaring adventure, but it also gives an honest portrayal of grief for young readers, and shows us that whilst sadness does exist in the world, it doesn’t have to cancel out happiness, or silliness, even when you lose someone you love.

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